Coverart for item
The Resource Gunfighter nation : the myth of the frontier in Twentieth-Century America, Richard Slotkin

Gunfighter nation : the myth of the frontier in Twentieth-Century America, Richard Slotkin

Label
Gunfighter nation : the myth of the frontier in Twentieth-Century America
Title
Gunfighter nation
Title remainder
the myth of the frontier in Twentieth-Century America
Statement of responsibility
Richard Slotkin
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • On July 16, 1960, John F. Kennedy came to the podium of the Los Angeles Coliseum to accept the Democratic Party's nomination as candidate for President. As is customary in American political oratory, Kennedy used his acceptance speech to provide a slogan that would characterize his administration's style of thought and action. "I stand tonight facing West on what was once the last frontier. From the lands that stretch 3000 miles behind me, the pioneers of old gave up
  • their safety, their comfort and sometimes their lives to build a new world here in the West.. ..[But] the problems are not all solved and the battles are not all won, and we stand today on the edge of a new frontier - the frontier of the 1960s, a frontier of unknown opportunities and paths, a frontier of unfulfilled hopes and threats." By invoking the Frontier as a symbol to trademark his candidacy, Kennedy also tapped into one of the most resonant and persistent
  • American myths. As Richard Slotkin shows in this extraordinarily informed and wide-ranging new book, the myth of the Frontier has been perhaps the most pervasive influence behind American culture and politics in this century;. Gunfighter Nation: The Myth of the Frontier in Twentieth-Century America brings to completion a distinguished trilogy of books that includes The Fatal Environment and the award-winning Regeneration Through Violence. Beginning in 1893 at the World
  • Columbian Exposition in Chicago with Frederick Jackson Turner's famous address on the closing of the American frontier and Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, Slotkin examines the transformation from history to myth of events like Custer's last stand and explores the myriad and fundamental ways the myth influences American culture and politics. Although Turner's "Frontier Thesis" became the dominant interpretation of our national experience among academic historians, it was
  • the racialist theory of history (the ascendancy and superiority of the Anglo-Saxon race), embodied in Theodore Roosevelt's The Winning of the West, that was most influential in popular culture and government policy-making over the course of this century; The explicit assumptions about race and civilization in the Frontier myth articulated by Roosevelt provided the justification for most of America's expansionist policies, from Roosevelt's own Rough riders to Kennedy's
  • and Johnson's counterinsurgency policies in Southeast Asia. Thus America's defeat in Vietnam, Slotkin argues, ruptured the very foundation of our public mythology, and caused a crisis of confidence unprecedented in American history. Drawing on an impressive and diverse array of materials from dime novels, pulp fiction and Hollywood westerns to the writings and careers of figures such as Theodore Roosevelt, Owen Wister, Jesse James, Zane Grey, John Ford, Sam Peckinpah,
  • John Wayne and John F. Kennedy, Richard Slotkin reveals the connections that link our mythology with real life (he sees it as no surprise that The Wild Bunch was in the theaters while the revelation of the Mylai Massacre was on the newsstands). Richard Slotkin has been referred to as "one of the most gifted people alive when it comes to the cultural interpretation of fiction" (Patricia Limerick, The Yale Review). With Gunfighter Nation, he confirms himself as one of our
  • preeminent cultural critics. Sure to spark intense debate, this monumental book offers an original, incisive and highly provocative interpretation of our national experience
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1942-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Slotkin, Richard
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Popular culture
  • Frontier and pioneer life
  • Frontier thesis
Label
Gunfighter nation : the myth of the frontier in Twentieth-Century America, Richard Slotkin
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 767-828) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Third World Revolutions: The "Zapata Problem" and the Counterinsurgency Scenario, 1952-1954. Coloring the Looking-Glass: Mexico as Mythic Space, 1912-1952. The "Zapata Problem": The Strong Man Makes a Weak People. The Man Who Knows Communists: The Heroic Sale of C
  • Myth and Historical Memory. The Politics of Myth. Regeneration Through Violence: The Language of the Myth. The Frontier Myth as a Theory of Development: "Progressives" and "Populists" -- Pt. I. The Mythology of Progressivism, 1880-1902. 1. The Winning of the West: Theodore Roosevelt's Frontier Thesis, 1880-1900. Sources and Premises. The Historian as Hunter. The Winning of the West: A Progressive Myth of Origins. Recovering the Frontier: Regeneration Through Imperialism. 2. The White City and the Wild West: Buffalo Bill and the Mythic Space of American History, 1880-1917. Staging Reality: The Creation of Buffalo Bill, 1869-1883. The Wild West and the Ritualization of American History. The Ritual Frontier and the Sanctification of Imperialism. 3. Mob, Tribe, and Regiment: Modernization as Militarization, 1883-1902. Origins of the Military Metaphor. Cavalry in the Streets, 1890-1896. Roosevelt's Rough Riders: The Regiment as Social Microcosm. The Philippine "Insurrection" as Savage War, 1898-1902. "1008 Dead Niggers": The Logic of Massacre -- Pt. II. Populists and Progressives: Literary Myth and Ideological Style, 1872-1940. 4. Mythologies of Resistance: Outlaws, Detectives, and Dime-Novel Populism, 1873-1903. Social Banditry in Fact and Fiction: The Reconstruction Outlaws 1865-1880. The Pinkerton Detective: Hawkeye Among the Communists. The Outlaw/Detective: Heroic Style as Ideology. The Significances of Dime-Novel Populism. 5. Aristocracy of Violence: Virility, Vigilante Politics, and Red-Blooded Fiction, 1895-1910. "Men Who Do the Work of the World." Recovering the Savage: Remington, London, Garland. The Virginian (1902) and the Myth of the Vigilante. Democracy or Civilization: Dixon's The Clansman (1904). The Political Uses of Symbolic Violence. 6. From the Open Range to the Mean Streets: Myth and Formula Fiction, 1910-1940. Edgar Rice Burroughs: The Virginian in Outer Space, 1911-1925. Zane Grey: The Formula Western, 1911-1925. The Virginian in Nighttown: Origins of the Hard-boiled Detective, 1910-1940 -- Pt. III. Colonizing a Mythic Landscape: Movie Westerns, 1903-1948. 7. Formulas on Film: Myth and Genre in the Silent Movie, 1903-1926. Genre as Mythic Space. Cinematic Form and Mythographic Function: Griffith's Birth of a Nation (1915). Icons of Authenticity: The Movie Star as Progressive Hero. The Epic Western, 1923-1931. 8. The Studio System, the Depression, and the Eclipse of the Western, 1930-1938. The Studio as Genre-Machine, 1930-1938. The Two-Gun Man of the Twenties: Gangster Films, 1931-1939. The World-scale Western: "Victorian Empire" Movies, 1935-1940. "Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch...": "B" Westerns, 1931-1939. 9. The Western Is American History, 1939-1941. The Rediscovery of American History. The Renaissance of the Feature Western: The Cult of the Outlaw. The Apotheosis of the "B" Western: John Ford's Stagecoach (1939). 10. Lost Stands and Lost Patrols: The Western and the War Film, 1940-1948. The Problem of Engagement: For Whom the Bell Tolls (1939). The Problem of Defeat: Bataan (1943) as Last Stand. The Problem of Victory: Objective Burma (1945). The Problem of Memory: Fort Apache (1948) -- Pt. IV. Democracy and Force: The Western and the Cold War, 1946-1960. 11. Studies in Red and White: Cavalry, Indians and Cold War Ideology, 1946-1954. Real-World Problems in Mythic Spaces: Dramatizing the Problem of Force. Cult of the Cavalry: Rio Grande (1950) and the Korean War. Cult of the Indian: Devil's Doorway and Broken Arrow (1950). 12. Killer Elite: The Cult of the Gunfighter, 1950-1953. The Revised Outlaw: From Rebel to Psychopath. The Invention of the Gunfighter. High Noon (1952): The Hero in Spite of Democracy. A Good Man with a Gun: Shane (1953). The Gunfighter Mystique. 13. Imagining
Control code
ocm25281419
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xii, 850 pages
Isbn
9780689121630
Lccn
92004446 //r92
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)25281419
  • (Sirsi) a158032
Label
Gunfighter nation : the myth of the frontier in Twentieth-Century America, Richard Slotkin
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 767-828) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Third World Revolutions: The "Zapata Problem" and the Counterinsurgency Scenario, 1952-1954. Coloring the Looking-Glass: Mexico as Mythic Space, 1912-1952. The "Zapata Problem": The Strong Man Makes a Weak People. The Man Who Knows Communists: The Heroic Sale of C
  • Myth and Historical Memory. The Politics of Myth. Regeneration Through Violence: The Language of the Myth. The Frontier Myth as a Theory of Development: "Progressives" and "Populists" -- Pt. I. The Mythology of Progressivism, 1880-1902. 1. The Winning of the West: Theodore Roosevelt's Frontier Thesis, 1880-1900. Sources and Premises. The Historian as Hunter. The Winning of the West: A Progressive Myth of Origins. Recovering the Frontier: Regeneration Through Imperialism. 2. The White City and the Wild West: Buffalo Bill and the Mythic Space of American History, 1880-1917. Staging Reality: The Creation of Buffalo Bill, 1869-1883. The Wild West and the Ritualization of American History. The Ritual Frontier and the Sanctification of Imperialism. 3. Mob, Tribe, and Regiment: Modernization as Militarization, 1883-1902. Origins of the Military Metaphor. Cavalry in the Streets, 1890-1896. Roosevelt's Rough Riders: The Regiment as Social Microcosm. The Philippine "Insurrection" as Savage War, 1898-1902. "1008 Dead Niggers": The Logic of Massacre -- Pt. II. Populists and Progressives: Literary Myth and Ideological Style, 1872-1940. 4. Mythologies of Resistance: Outlaws, Detectives, and Dime-Novel Populism, 1873-1903. Social Banditry in Fact and Fiction: The Reconstruction Outlaws 1865-1880. The Pinkerton Detective: Hawkeye Among the Communists. The Outlaw/Detective: Heroic Style as Ideology. The Significances of Dime-Novel Populism. 5. Aristocracy of Violence: Virility, Vigilante Politics, and Red-Blooded Fiction, 1895-1910. "Men Who Do the Work of the World." Recovering the Savage: Remington, London, Garland. The Virginian (1902) and the Myth of the Vigilante. Democracy or Civilization: Dixon's The Clansman (1904). The Political Uses of Symbolic Violence. 6. From the Open Range to the Mean Streets: Myth and Formula Fiction, 1910-1940. Edgar Rice Burroughs: The Virginian in Outer Space, 1911-1925. Zane Grey: The Formula Western, 1911-1925. The Virginian in Nighttown: Origins of the Hard-boiled Detective, 1910-1940 -- Pt. III. Colonizing a Mythic Landscape: Movie Westerns, 1903-1948. 7. Formulas on Film: Myth and Genre in the Silent Movie, 1903-1926. Genre as Mythic Space. Cinematic Form and Mythographic Function: Griffith's Birth of a Nation (1915). Icons of Authenticity: The Movie Star as Progressive Hero. The Epic Western, 1923-1931. 8. The Studio System, the Depression, and the Eclipse of the Western, 1930-1938. The Studio as Genre-Machine, 1930-1938. The Two-Gun Man of the Twenties: Gangster Films, 1931-1939. The World-scale Western: "Victorian Empire" Movies, 1935-1940. "Meanwhile, Back at the Ranch...": "B" Westerns, 1931-1939. 9. The Western Is American History, 1939-1941. The Rediscovery of American History. The Renaissance of the Feature Western: The Cult of the Outlaw. The Apotheosis of the "B" Western: John Ford's Stagecoach (1939). 10. Lost Stands and Lost Patrols: The Western and the War Film, 1940-1948. The Problem of Engagement: For Whom the Bell Tolls (1939). The Problem of Defeat: Bataan (1943) as Last Stand. The Problem of Victory: Objective Burma (1945). The Problem of Memory: Fort Apache (1948) -- Pt. IV. Democracy and Force: The Western and the Cold War, 1946-1960. 11. Studies in Red and White: Cavalry, Indians and Cold War Ideology, 1946-1954. Real-World Problems in Mythic Spaces: Dramatizing the Problem of Force. Cult of the Cavalry: Rio Grande (1950) and the Korean War. Cult of the Indian: Devil's Doorway and Broken Arrow (1950). 12. Killer Elite: The Cult of the Gunfighter, 1950-1953. The Revised Outlaw: From Rebel to Psychopath. The Invention of the Gunfighter. High Noon (1952): The Hero in Spite of Democracy. A Good Man with a Gun: Shane (1953). The Gunfighter Mystique. 13. Imagining
Control code
ocm25281419
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xii, 850 pages
Isbn
9780689121630
Lccn
92004446 //r92
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)25281419
  • (Sirsi) a158032

Library Locations

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