Coverart for item
The Resource After the French Revolution : six critics of democracy and nationalism, Jack Hayward

After the French Revolution : six critics of democracy and nationalism, Jack Hayward

Label
After the French Revolution : six critics of democracy and nationalism
Title
After the French Revolution
Title remainder
six critics of democracy and nationalism
Statement of responsibility
Jack Hayward
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • The French Revolution has generally been recognized as the starting point of modernity. It is the source, in their modern guise, of the founding myths of the nation as the basis of political community and democracy and as the only legitimate way of managing political affairs. While the Revolution, narrowly defined, has been exhaustively denounced and eulogized, its antecedents and more especially its legacies, have been neglected. After the French Revolution aims to
  • rectify this phenomenon. It starts by considering the ideological precursors (including Montesquieu, Rousseau, Condorcet and Sieyes) and the political protagonists (notably Robespierre and the Idealogues) who set the scene for nineteenth century debate and action. Six of the critics of what became the predominant tradition in France are considered in turn, ranging from the extreme Right to the extreme Left. Maistre represents the reactionary, theocratic Right, while
  • Saint-Simon represents the modernizing industrial Right. Liberalism is advocated by the constitutionalist Constant and Toqueville, the champion of the decentralisation. On the Left, Proudhon is the exponent of pluralist and libertarian socialism, while Blanqui embodies the recourse to revolutionary dictatorship. In the concluding chapter, Jack Hayward asks the question: "Is the Revolution over?" While so many in France and elsewhere have sought either to "end the
  • Revolution" or more rarely proclaimed its permanence, the Revolution as a set of aspirations has not been achieved. While France itself has at least stable democratic institutions, the expectations aroused two hundred years ago have still not been satisfied. The Revolution is not yet over
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hayward, Jack Ernest Shalom
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
New York University studies in French culture and civilization
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Democracy
  • Nationalism
  • France
Label
After the French Revolution : six critics of democracy and nationalism, Jack Hayward
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [303]-359) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. The founding myth: the ideological precursors. What is a revolution? The rhetoric and the reality. The Old Regime. The reformist re-emergence of constitutionalism: liberalism and democracy -- 2. The founding myth: the protagonists. The revolutionary emergence of the people: democracy displaces liberalism. The disintegration of monarchical sovereignty. The eruption of the patriotic revolutionary dictatorship. An ephemeral bourgeois republic. The triumph of force over anarchy: the Napoleonic despotism. Fictions with a future: the revolutionary legacy -- 3. Maistre: the compleat counter-revolutionary? Before the Revolution. The impact of the Revolution. The enduring Revolution. Sovereignty versus democracy. The dogmatist of infallible theocracy. Maistre's impact: the meaning of his legacy -- 4. Saint-Simon and the industrial counter-revolution. The road to the golden age. Saint-Simon before the Revolution. The formative influences. False solutions: the thirst for power. Ending the Revolution: consensus through scientism. Consensus through meritocratic industrialism. Replacing politics by administration: the entrepreneurial elites. Saint-Simon's counter-revolutionary legacies -- 5. Constant: part-time citizenship and constitutional freedom. Before Madame de Stael. Political activist and pamphleteer for the Directory. Against tyranny: a Rousseauist emperor? 1814-15: Three political gambles and three fiascos. Against counter-revolution. The Revolution resumes: a liberal apotheosis? -- 6. Tocqueville: the decentralist antidote to bureaucratic democracy. Predecessors. Understanding the democratic revolution. Three contexts: Monarchy, Republic, Empire. Counter-revolutionary democracy: America, Britain and France. Bureaucratic centralization and its antidotes. The spectre of persisting social revolution -- 7. Proudhon and libertarian socialism. Revolutionary reform: 1789 and 1848. Proudhon's predecessors. The onslaught on inequality and private property. 1848: Class conflict or class reconciliation? Imprisoned prophet of the Second Republic's suicide. Towards industrial democracy: a universal working middle class? Against absolute authority: antitheism and federalist pluralism. Permanent revolution from below: the rhetoric of unending reform -- 8. Conspiratorial communism, revolutionary dictatorship and Blanqui. Jacobin communism: Babeuf's legacy through Buonarroti to Blanqui. The making of a prototypical professional revolutionary. Subversion as a way of life. 1848: The culmination of class war. Interpreting the failure of 1848. 1871: The Paris Commune and Blanqui's legacy -- 9. Is the Revolution over? Thiers and the taming of the French Revolution. Republican elitism: its political, scientistic and educational constituents. The consolidators: in search of an elusive consensus. National integration and socio-economic change. The excluded: anti-revolutionaries and ultra-revolutionaries. Republican reconciliation. The Revolution is not entirely over. The Revolution: retrospect and prospect
Control code
ocm24215468
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xvi, 366 pages
Isbn
9780814734803
Lccn
91029800
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)24215468
  • (Sirsi) a426734
Label
After the French Revolution : six critics of democracy and nationalism, Jack Hayward
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [303]-359) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. The founding myth: the ideological precursors. What is a revolution? The rhetoric and the reality. The Old Regime. The reformist re-emergence of constitutionalism: liberalism and democracy -- 2. The founding myth: the protagonists. The revolutionary emergence of the people: democracy displaces liberalism. The disintegration of monarchical sovereignty. The eruption of the patriotic revolutionary dictatorship. An ephemeral bourgeois republic. The triumph of force over anarchy: the Napoleonic despotism. Fictions with a future: the revolutionary legacy -- 3. Maistre: the compleat counter-revolutionary? Before the Revolution. The impact of the Revolution. The enduring Revolution. Sovereignty versus democracy. The dogmatist of infallible theocracy. Maistre's impact: the meaning of his legacy -- 4. Saint-Simon and the industrial counter-revolution. The road to the golden age. Saint-Simon before the Revolution. The formative influences. False solutions: the thirst for power. Ending the Revolution: consensus through scientism. Consensus through meritocratic industrialism. Replacing politics by administration: the entrepreneurial elites. Saint-Simon's counter-revolutionary legacies -- 5. Constant: part-time citizenship and constitutional freedom. Before Madame de Stael. Political activist and pamphleteer for the Directory. Against tyranny: a Rousseauist emperor? 1814-15: Three political gambles and three fiascos. Against counter-revolution. The Revolution resumes: a liberal apotheosis? -- 6. Tocqueville: the decentralist antidote to bureaucratic democracy. Predecessors. Understanding the democratic revolution. Three contexts: Monarchy, Republic, Empire. Counter-revolutionary democracy: America, Britain and France. Bureaucratic centralization and its antidotes. The spectre of persisting social revolution -- 7. Proudhon and libertarian socialism. Revolutionary reform: 1789 and 1848. Proudhon's predecessors. The onslaught on inequality and private property. 1848: Class conflict or class reconciliation? Imprisoned prophet of the Second Republic's suicide. Towards industrial democracy: a universal working middle class? Against absolute authority: antitheism and federalist pluralism. Permanent revolution from below: the rhetoric of unending reform -- 8. Conspiratorial communism, revolutionary dictatorship and Blanqui. Jacobin communism: Babeuf's legacy through Buonarroti to Blanqui. The making of a prototypical professional revolutionary. Subversion as a way of life. 1848: The culmination of class war. Interpreting the failure of 1848. 1871: The Paris Commune and Blanqui's legacy -- 9. Is the Revolution over? Thiers and the taming of the French Revolution. Republican elitism: its political, scientistic and educational constituents. The consolidators: in search of an elusive consensus. National integration and socio-economic change. The excluded: anti-revolutionaries and ultra-revolutionaries. Republican reconciliation. The Revolution is not entirely over. The Revolution: retrospect and prospect
Control code
ocm24215468
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
xvi, 366 pages
Isbn
9780814734803
Lccn
91029800
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
  • (OCoLC)24215468
  • (Sirsi) a426734

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